Read how Mark Wahlberg donated his $1.5 million 'All The Money' fee to Time's Up

In the wake of an uproar over the $1.5 million Mark Wahlberg was paid for his All The Money In The World reshoots, the actor announced Saturday that he will donate the money in his costar Michelle Williams' name to the Time's Up legal defense fund.

Wahlberg's hefty reshoot fee made headlines earlier this week after it was reported that Williams earned just $1,000 for her time. 
The cast of All The Money In The World reshot multiple scenes after director Ridley Scott cut actor Kevin Spacey from the film following multiple sexual assault allegations. Christopher Plummer replaced him. USA Today first reported the massive pay discrepancy on Tuesday.
In December, Scott told USA Today that all the actors – excluding Plummer – reshot the film for free. Not so, as it turns out.
Wahlberg's plan to donate his reshoot fee is a kind of bare minimum gesture following a week of bad press. On Thursday, USA Today published a story claiming that Wahlberg had co-star approval written into his contract. The piece alleges that it wasn't until Wahlberg secured a massive fee that he approved Plummer's casting. If true, holding up a casting decision to profit off of a controversy is... not a great look for Wahlberg. 
Per The Hollywood Reporter, Wahlberg's agency WME – which also represents Williams – will also donate $500,000 to Time's Up. 
WME's statement, via THR:
"The current conversation is a reminder that those of us in a position of influence have a responsibility to challenge inequities, including the gender wage gap," WME said. "In recognition of the pay discrepancy on the All the Money in the World reshoots, WME is donating an additional $500,000 to the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund in Michelle Williams’ name, following our $1 million pledge to the organization earlier this month. It’s crucial that this conversation continues within our community and we are committed to being part of the solution."
Time's Up is an initiative from 300 women working in the entertainment industry who aim to support women in lower-paying industries who are more vulnerable to sexual harassment and abuse.
From the Time's Up website:
"We partner with leading advocates for equality and safety to improve laws, employment agreements, and corporate policies; help change the face of corporate boardrooms and the C-suite; and enable more women and men to access our legal system to hold wrongdoers accountable."

SOURCE: Mashables